Physical and cognitive functioning of people older than 90 years: A comparison of two Danish cohorts born 10 years apart

Kaare Christensen, Mikael Thinggaard, Anna Oksuzyan, Troels Steenstrup, Karen Andersen-Ranberg, Bernard Jeune, Matt McGue, James W. Vaupel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

208 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background A rapidly increasing proportion of people in high-income countries are surviving into their tenth decade. Concern is widespread that the basis for this development is the survival of frail and disabled elderly people into very old age. To investigate this issue, we compared the cognitive and physical functioning of two cohorts of Danish nonagenarians, born 10 years apart. Methods People in the first cohort were born in 1905 and assessed at age 93 years (n=2262); those in the second cohort were born in 1915 and assessed at age 95 years (n=1584). All cohort members were eligible irrespective of type of residence. Both cohorts were assessed by surveys that used the same design and assessment instrument, and had almost identical response rates (63%). Cognitive functioning was assessed by mini-mental state examination and a composite of five cognitive tests that are sensitive to age-related changes. Physical functioning was assessed by an activities of daily living score and by physical performance tests (grip strength, chair stand, and gait speed). Findings The chance of surviving from birth to age 93 years was 28% higher in the 1915 cohort than in the 1905 cohort (6·50% vs 5·06%), and the chance of reaching 95 years was 32% higher in 1915 cohort (3·93% vs 2·98%). The 1915 cohort scored significantly better on the mini-mental state examination than did the 1905 cohort (22·8 [SD 5·6] vs 21·4 [6·0]; p<0·0001), with a substantially higher proportion of participants obtaining maximum scores (28-30 points; 277 [23%] vs 235 [13%]; p<0·0001). Similarly, the cognitive composite score was signifi cantly better in the 1915 than in the 1905 cohort (0·49 [SD 3·6] vs 0·01 [SD 3·6]; p=0·0003). The cohorts did not differ consistently in the physical performance tests, but the 1915 cohort had significantly better activities of daily living scores than did the 1905 cohort (2·0 [SD 0·8] vs 1·8 [0·7]; p<0·0001). Interpretation Despite being 2 years older at assessment, the 1915 cohort scored significantly better than the 1905 cohort on both the cognitive tests and the activities of daily living score, which suggests that more people are living to older ages with better overall functioning. Funding Danish National Research Foundation; US National Institutes of Health-National Institute on Aging; Danish Agency for Science, Technology and Innovation; VELUX Foundation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1507-1513
Number of pages7
JournalThe Lancet
Volume382
Issue number9903
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The Danish 1905 cohort survey was supported by grants from the Danish National Research Foundation and the US National Institutes of Health—National Institute on Aging (grant number P01 AG08761 ). The Danish 1915 cohort study is supported by a grant from the Danish Agency for Science, Technology and Innovation (grant number 09–070081 ). The Danish Aging Research Center is supported by a grant from the VELUX Foundation.

Copyright:
Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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