Physician evaluations of care management practices in medicaid programs

George H. Avery, Douglas R. Wholey, Jon B Christianson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To assess differences in care management practices for Medicaid beneficiaries in predominantly commercial and predominantly Medicaid health plans. Stydy Design: Physicians in the networks of 8 managed care plans participating in Medicaid programs were surveyed regarding the availability and usefulness of care management practices and the overall quality of care management. The responses of physicians in plans serving predominantly Medicaid enrollees were contrasted with the responses of physicians in predominantly commercial plans who cared for Medicaid enrollees. Methods: Logistic regression analysis was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios relating to the availability of care management practices. Multiple regression techniques were used to construct comparisons of adjusted means relating to the usefulness of practices and the overall quality of care management. Results: Physicians in predominantly commercial plans reported greater availability of care management practices. No patterns of differences were noted in ratings of the usefulness of practices if available. Physicians in predominantly commercial plans rated the quality of care management higher than physicians in predominantly Medicaid plans. However, there remains room for substantial improvement for commercial and other Medicaid contracting plans. Conclusions: Commercial plans add value to Medicaid programs, and efforts to discourage their withdrawal from participation are justified. However, physician evaluations support the potential for better care management in all types of contracting plans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)156-164
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Managed Care
Volume11
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1 2005

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Physician evaluations of care management practices in medicaid programs'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this