POLYRATE: A general computer program for variational transition state theory and semiclassical tunneling calculations of chemical reaction rates

Alan D. Isaacson, Donald G. Truhlar, Sachchida N. Rai, Rozeanne Steckler, Gene C. Hancock, Bruce C. Garrett, Michael J. Redmon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

65 Scopus citations

Abstract

We present a computer program for calculating rate constants of gas-phase chemical reactions involving one or two reactants with a total of three to ten atoms. The program accepts information about the potential energy surface in the form of either an analytic potential energy function or a sequence of geometries, energies, gradients and second (or higher) derivative matrices at points along the reaction path. In the former case the program itself calculates the reaction pathe and the sequence of derivative matrices. From this information the program calculates the rate constant for quantized internal degrees of freedom and classical reaction-path motion by variational transition state theory (VTST). The probabilities for tunneling and nonclassical reflection are estimated by semiclassical methods and incorporated by a transmission coefficient, which for thermal reactions is based on the ground state. There are several options for including the effects of anharmonicity in the independent-normal-mode approximation, and the reaction-path curvature may be included in the tunneling calculation by the small-curvature approximation. The article also presents test calculations illustrating the use of new reaction-path interpolation and extrapolation procedures which should be useful in conjunction with VTST calculations based on ab initio gradients and Hessian calculations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-102
Number of pages12
JournalComputer Physics Communications
Volume47
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1987

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