Pop internationalism: Has half a century of world music trade displaced local culture?

Fernando Ferreira, Joel Waldfogel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Advances in communication technologies have increased the availability of cultural goods across borders, raising concerns that cultural products from large economies will displace those in smaller economies. This article provides stylised facts about global music consumption and trade since 1960 using a unique data on popular music charts corresponding to over 98% of the global music market. Contrary to growing fears about large-country dominance, our gravity estimates show a substantial bias towards domestic music that has, perhaps surprisingly, increased in the past decade. Moreover, we find no evidence that new communications channels reduce the consumption of domestic music.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)634-664
Number of pages31
JournalEconomic Journal
Volume123
Issue number569
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013

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