Potential roles of the rodent medial prefrontal cortex in conflict resolution between multiple decision-making systems

Amber E. McLaughlin, Geoffrey W. Diehl, A. David Redish

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Mammalian decision-making is mediated by the interaction of multiple, neurally and computationally separable decision systems. Having multiple systems requires a mechanism to manage conflict and converge onto the selection of singular actions. A long history of evidence has pointed to the prefrontal cortex as a central component in processing the interactions between distinct decision systems and resolving conflicts among them. In this chapter we review four theories of how that interaction might occur and identify how the medial prefrontal cortex in the rodent may be involved in each theory. We then present experimental predictions implied by the neurobiological data in the context of each theory as a starting point for future investigation of medial prefrontal cortex and decision-making.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationInternational Review of Neurobiology
EditorsAdam T. Brockett, Adam T. Brockett, Linda M. Amarante, Mark Laubach, Matthew R. Roesch, Matthew R. Roesch
PublisherAcademic Press Inc.
Pages249-281
Number of pages33
ISBN (Print)9780323853361
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

Publication series

NameInternational Review of Neurobiology
Volume158
ISSN (Print)0074-7742
ISSN (Electronic)2162-5514

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Elsevier Inc.

Keywords

  • Anterior cingulate cortex
  • Central executive
  • Decision conflict
  • Decision-making
  • Deliberation
  • Infralimbic cortex
  • Multiple decision systems
  • Pavlovian
  • Prelimbic cortex
  • Procedural

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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