Prediction of absolute risk of acute graft-versus-host disease following hematopoietic cell transplantation

Catherine Lee, Sebastien Haneuse, Hai Lin Wang, Sherri Rose, Stephen R. Spellman, Michael Verneris, Katharine C. Hsu, Katharina Fleischhauer, Stephanie J. Lee, Reza Abdi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the treatment of choice for a variety of hematologic malignancies and disorders. Unfortunately, acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a frequent complication of HCT. While substantial research has identified clinical, genetic and proteomic risk factors for acute GVHD, few studies have sought to develop risk prediction tools that quantify absolute risk. Such tools would be useful for: optimizing donor selection; guiding GVHD prophylaxis, post-transplant treatment and monitoring strategies; and, recruitment of patients into clinical trials. Using data on 9,651 patients who underwent first allogeneic HLA-identical sibling or unrelated donor HCT between 01/1999-12/2011 for treatment of a hematologic malignancy, we developed and evaluated a suite of risk prediction tools for: (i) acute GVHD within 100 days post-transplant and (ii) a composite endpoint of acute GVHD or death within 100 days post-transplant. We considered two sets of inputs: (i) clinical factors that are typically readily-available, included as main effects; and, (ii) main effects combined with a selection of a priori specified two-way interactions. To build the prediction tools we used the super learner, a recently developed ensemble learning statistical framework that combines results from multiple other algorithms/methods to construct a single, optimal prediction tool. Across the final super learner prediction tools, the area-under-the curve (AUC) ranged from 0.613–0.640. Improving the performance of risk prediction tools will likely require extension beyond clinical factors to include biological variables such as genetic and proteomic biomarkers, although the measurement of these factors may currently not be practical in standard clinical settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0190610
JournalPloS one
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding for this work was provided by National Institutes of Health grants R01 CA181360-01 and 5K24AI116925 and the Center for International Blood and Marrow Research (CIBMTR). CIBMTR is supported by several commercial entities, of which the full list can be found at https://wwwtest.cibmtr.org/Support/ Supporters/pages/index.aspx. The views expressed in this article do not reflect the official policy or position of the National Institutes of Health, the Department of the Navy, the Department of Defense, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) or any other agency of the U.S. Government. The funders had no role in the study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. Funding for this work was provided by National Institutes of Health grants R01 CA181360-01 and 5K24AI116925. The CIBMTR is supported primarily by Public Health Service Grant/ Cooperative Agreement 5U24-CA076518 from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID); a Grant/Cooperative Agreement 5U10HL069294 from NHLBI and NCI; a contract HHSH250201200016C with Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA/DHHS); two Grants N00014-15-1-0848 and N00014-16-1-2020 from the Office of Naval Research; and grants from Actinium Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; Alexion; Amgen, Inc.; Anonymous donation to the Medical College of Wisconsin; Astellas Pharma US; AstraZeneca; Atara Biotherapeutics, Inc.; Be the Match Foundation; Bluebird Bio, Inc.; Bristol Myers Squibb Oncology; Celgene Corporation; Cellular Dynamics International, Inc.; Cerus Corporation; Chimerix, Inc.; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center; Gamida Cell Ltd.; Genen-tech, Inc.; Genzyme Corporation; Gilead Sciences, Inc.; Health Research, Inc. Roswell Park Cancer Institute; HistoGenetics, Inc.; Incyte Corporation; Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC; Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; Jeff Gordon Children’s Foundation; The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society; Medac, GmbH; MedImmune; The Medical College of Wisconsin; Merck & Co, Inc.; Mesoblast; MesoScale Diagnostics, Inc.; Miltenyi Biotec, Inc.; National Marrow Donor Program; Neovii Biotech NA, Inc.; Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation; Onyx Pharmaceuticals; Optum Healthcare Solutions, Inc.; Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc.; Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd.–Japan; PCORI; Perkin Elmer, Inc.; Pfizer, Inc; Sanofi US; Seattle Genetics; Spectrum Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; St. Baldrick’s Foundation; Sunesis Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; Swedish Orphan Biovitrum, Inc.; Takeda Oncology; Telomere Diagnostics, Inc.; University of Minnesota; and Wellpoint, Inc. The views expressed in this article do not reflect the official policy or position of the National Institute of Health, the Department of the Navy, the Department of Defense, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) or any other agency of the U.S. Government.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 Lee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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