Predictors of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli in the feces of vegetarians and newly hospitalized adults in Minnesota and Wisconsin

Mark R. Sannes, Edward A. Belongia, Burney Kieke, Kirk Smith, Amy Kieke, Mary Vandermause, Jeff Bender, Connie Clabots, Patricia Winokur, James R. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

To determine whether poultry contact/consumption predicts colonization with antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli, 567 newly hospitalized patients and 100 vegetarians were assessed microbiologically and epidemiologically. Multivariable analysis showed that poultry contact/consumption, other dietary habits, and antimicrobial use did not significantly predict resistance. In contrast, foreign travel significantly predicted both trimethoprim- sulfamethoxazole resistance (prevalence ratio, 2.7 [95% confidence interval, 1.3-5.6]) and "any resistance" (total population), whereas intensive-care-unit exposure predicted any resistance (hospital patients). Thus, most of the individual-level exposures - including poultry contact/consumption - that had been expected to be significant risk factors for infection with antimicrobial-resistant E. coli did not prove to be such. Other exposures, including household-, community-, and population-level effects,maybe more important.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)430-434
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume197
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2008

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