Predictors of change of trabecular bone score (TBS) in older men: results from the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study

for the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study Research Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Summary: Among older men, characteristics that predict longitudinal changes in trabecular bone score (TBS) are different from characteristics that predict changes in bone mineral density (BMD). Most notably, weight loss is strongly associated with concomitant loss in BMD but with concomitant increases in TBS, when measured on Hologic densitometers. Introduction: Our objective was to compare and contrast predictors of changes in TBS, total hip BMD, and lumbar spine BMD. Methods: Our study population was 3969 Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) cohort participants (mean age 72.8 years) with repeat measures of TBS, lumbar spine and total hip BMD, body mass index (BMI) less than 37 kg/m2, and no use of bisphosphonate or glucocorticoid medications. TBS was scored (Med-Imaps Software version 2.1) and BMD measured on Hologic densitometers. Results: One thousand four hundred forty-four men had a TBS decrease > 0.04 units (estimated least significant change for TBS), 795 men had a TBS increase > 0.04 units, and 1730 men had TBS change ≤ 0.04 units over mean follow-up of 4.6 years. Older age was not associated with TBS change, but was associated with greater decline in lumbar spine and total hip BMD. Compared to stable weight, > 10% weight loss was strongly associated with an increase in TBS [effect size = 1.24 (95% CI 1.12, 1.36)] and strongly associated with a decrease in total hip BMD [− 1.16 (95% CI − 1.19, − 1.03)]. Other predictors discordant for longitudinal changes of TBS and BMD included baseline BMI, walk speed, and ACE inhibitor use. Conclusions: Predictors of changes in TBS are different from predictors of changes in lumbar spine and total hip BMD. At least when assessed on Hologic densitometers, weight loss is associated with subsequent declines in spine and total hip BMD but subsequent increase in TBS. Faster walk speed may protect against loss of hip BMD, but is not associated with longitudinal changes of TBS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-59
Number of pages11
JournalOsteoporosis International
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding information The analyses for this study were supported by the National Institutes on Aging funding primarily under the grant number R21AG046571. The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study is also supported by the National Institutes of Health funding. The following institutes provide support: the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), and the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research under the following grant numbers: U01 AG027810, U01 AG042124, U01 AG042139, U01 AG042140, U01 AG042143, U01 AG042145, U01 AG042168, U01 AR066160, and UL1 TR000128.

Funding Information:
Conflicts of interest Dr. Ann V. Schwartz has received research grant support from Hologic, Inc. All the other authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017, International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation.

Keywords

  • BMD
  • Bone mineral density
  • Longitudinal change
  • TBS
  • Trabecular bone score
  • Weight loss

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