Predictors of success in implementing HIV prevention in rural America: A state-level structural factor analysis of HIV prevention targeting men who have sex with men

B. R.Simon Rosser, Keith J. Horvath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Relatively few studies have examined the impact of modifying structural factors on HIV prevention efforts in the United States despite their high potential for lowering HIV prevalence rates. The aim of this study was to identify state-level characteristics of successful HIV prevention implementation. Structured interviews with 73 key informants in 13 rural states identified 'more successful' and 'less successful' states in HIV prevention. States were compared on demographic, religious, gay community, and funding variables. The 7 more successful states had both a wider variety and more MSM-targeted interventions. Overall funding, degree of epidemic, and "ruralness" were not significantly associated with success. Rather, successful states had less religious and Evangelical Protestant adherents and more 'gay community' infrastructure. They also spent a greater proportion of funds contracting community-based organizations and on MSM-targeted programming. Success in HIV prevention varies across rural states. Key demographic, social and economic indicators distinguish success in HIV prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)159-168
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2008

Keywords

  • MSM
  • Prevention planning
  • Rural HIV prevention
  • Structural research

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