Prescription Opioid Misuse After a Recent Sexual Assault: A Randomized Clinical Trial of a Video Intervention

Amanda K. Gilmore, Kate Walsh, Patricia Frazier, Linda Ledray, Ron Acierno, Kenneth J. Ruggiero, Dean G. Kilpatrick, Heidi S. Resnick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Prescription opioid (PO) misuse is increasing and is associated with overdose. Individuals who experienced a recent sexual assault are at risk for increased substance use, yet limited interventions target PO misuse after sexual assault. The current study examined the efficacy of video interventions on PO misuse after sexual assault. Methods: Adolescent girls and women (n = 154) were recruited in the context of a sexual assault medical forensic exam in the emergency department. Effects of a prevention of post-rape stress (PPRS) video and a pleasant imagery and relaxation instruction (PIRI) video were compared with treatment as usual (TAU) during a sexual assault medical forensic exam on PO misuse. Participants reported if they had used POs for non-medical purposes since the sexual assault at 1.5 month follow-up. Results: Results from a logistic regression analysis indicated that participants with a prior sexual assault were less likely to misuse prescription opioids 1.5 months after the assault in the PIRI condition compared with TAU. There were no main effects for video condition and no interactions for the PPRS condition on PO misuse. Discussion and Conclusions: Providing the PIRI video, or teaching other types of mindfulness or relaxation exercises, may be warranted as a secondary prevention for individuals during the sexual assault medical forensic exam for those with a prior sexual assault history. Scientific Significance: This research provides an initial examination of the impact of mindfulness skills recently after traumatic event exposure on PO misuse. (Am J Addict 2019;28:376–381).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)376-381
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal on Addictions
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Data collection and manuscript preparation was supported by grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA; R01DA023099 to Dr. Resnick and K23DA042935 to Dr. Gilmore).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry

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