Preserved speed of processing and memory in infants with a history of moderate neonatal encephalopathy treated with therapeutic hypothermia

Elizabeth P. Zorn, Lei Zhang, Kristin Sandness, Neely Miller, Tracy Riggins, Michael K. Georgieff, Katie M. Pfister

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective:: Survivors of neonatal encephalopathy (NE) are at risk for impaired cognition. The objective of this study was to assess speed of processing (SOP) and memory in infants with moderate NE. Study design:: Sample consisted of 17 infants with NE and 23 healthy controls. Visual-evoked potentials (VEP) were assessed at 8 months to assess SOP. Memory was assessed at 12 months using elicited imitation (EI). Memory and SOP had previously been assessed in this cohort in the newborn period. Results:: Infants with NE had similar SOP and EI performance as controls. Newborn SOP correlated with 8-month SOP in infants with NE, however, neonatal ERP memory measures were not correlated with EI performance at 12 months. Conclusions:: Infants with moderate NE treated with TH show preserved memory and SOP through 12 months. Early behavioral and electrophysiologic assessments of memory and SOP provide insight into developing cognitive functions in this risk group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1666-1673
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Perinatology
Volume38
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding : This research was funded by a grant from the Center for Neurobehavioral Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN. This study was also supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health Award Number UL1TR000114. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

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