Prevalence and Predictors of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Use among Ivy League College Students: Implications for Student Health Services

Amy L. Versnik Nowak, Joe Degise, Amanda Daugherty, Richard O'Keefe, Samuel Seward, Suma Setty, Fanny Tang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Determine prevalence and types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies used and test the significance of demographics and social cognitive constructs as predictors of CAM use in a college sample. Secondary purpose was to guide the integration of CAM therapies into college health services. Participants: Random, stratified sample of 2,553 undergraduates and graduate students enrolled at Columbia University. Methods: Web-based survey e-mailed to a random sample of 6,482 students. Regression analyses used to determine predictors of CAM use. Results: Nearly 82% of respondents reported using at least 1 form of CAM in the last 12 months, the most common being nonvitamin, nonmineral (NVNM) products, yoga, deep breathing exercises, massage therapy, and meditation. Sex, student home origin, outcome expectancies, observational learning, and attitude toward CAM were found as significant predictors of CAM use. Conclusions: Ongoing assessment of CAM use can assist administrators and providers to enhance college health services and programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)362-372
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of American College Health
Volume63
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 18 2015

Keywords

  • Alternative medicine
  • college
  • complementary medicine
  • social cognitive theory
  • university

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