Primary care providers' needs and preferences for information about colorectal cancer survivorship care

Talya Salz, Kevin C. Oeffinger, Peter R. Lewis, Robert L. Williams, Robert L. Rhyne, Mark W. Yeazel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The Institute of Medicine (IOM) proposed that cancer survivors and their primary care providers (PCPs) should receive survivorship care plans to inform ongoing care. We aimed to determine PCPs' preferences for the content of survivorship care plans for colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors. Methods: PCPs in 3 practice-based research networks completed a survey regarding 45 topics of CRC information based on the IOM's survivorship care plan framework. Results: One hundred fifty-six PCPs completed the survey. For 35 topics (78%), at least half of respondents felt the topic was very important. Most PCPs reported receiving too little information about problems with chemotherapy (68%) or radiation (60%) and whether the oncologist intended to monitor for other cancers (71%). PCPs widely agreed that they do not have enough information about increased risk of second CRCs, other cancers, and other diseases (78%); long-term effects of chemotherapy (73%) and radiation (67%); and genetic counseling (83%). Conclusions: PCPs endorse the IOM's survivorship care plan framework as relevant and often report needing more information. Survivorship care plans may provide important information to PCPs by communicating patients' cancer histories and making recommendations regarding which aspects of care should be provided by the oncologist or the PCP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)635-651
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of the American Board of Family Medicine
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Practice-based research
  • Practice-based research networks
  • Primary health care
  • Survivors

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