Prognostic factors for outcomes in allogeneic transplantation for CML in the imatinib era: A CIBMTR analysis

H. J. Khoury, M. Kukreja, J. M. Goldman, T. Wang, J. Halter, M. Arora, V. Gupta, D. A. Rizzieri, B. George, A. Keating, R. P. Gale, D. I. Marks, P. L. McCarthy, A. Woolfrey, J. Szer, S. A. Giralt, R. T. Maziarz, J. Cortes, M. M. Horowitz, S. J. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

55 Scopus citations

Abstract

Allogeneic hematopoietic SCT is an effective treatment in accelerated (AP) or blast phase (BP) CML. Imatinib (IM) has transient but significant activity in advanced phases of CML, which may permit early allografting for responding patients. To identify prognostic factors in allograft recipients previously treated with IM, we analyzed 449 allogeneic hematopoietic SCTs performed from 1999 to 2004 in advanced-phase CML, using the data reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. CML patients in second chronic phase (CP2, n=184), AP (n=185) and BP (n=80) received HLA-identical sibling (27%), related (3%), or matched or mismatched unrelated donor (70%), peripheral blood (47%) or BM (53%) hematopoietic SCT after myeloablative (78%) or non-myeloablative (22%) conditioning. In all, 52% in CP2, 49% in AP and 46% in BP received IM before hematopoietic SCT. Disease-free survival was 35-40% for CP2, 26-27% for AP and 8-11% for BP. Cumulative incidence of acute and chronic GVHD and TRM were not affected by the stages of CML or pre-hematopoietic SCT IM exposure. Multivariate analyses showed that conventional prognostic indicators remain the strongest determinants of transplant outcomes. In conclusion, there are no new prognostic indicators of the outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic SCT for advanced-phase CML in the IM era.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)810-816
Number of pages7
JournalBone marrow transplantation
Volume47
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Drs J Cortes and DA Rizzieri have received research funding from the Novartis. Dr Rizzieri also received an honorarium from Novartis. Dr Jeffrey Szer received a consultant or advisory role compensation from Novartis.

Funding Information:
The CIBMTR is supported by the Public Health Service Grant/ cooperative agreement U24-CA76518 from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID); a grant/cooperative agreement 5U01HL069294 from NHLBI and NCI; a contract HHSH234200637015C with Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA/DHHS); two grants, N00014-06-1-0704 and N00014-08-1-0058, from the Office of Naval Research; and grants from AABB; Allos, Inc.; Amgen, Inc.; Anonymous donation to the Medical College of Wisconsin; Astellas Pharma US, Inc.; Be the Match Foundation; Biogen IDEC; BioMarin Pharmaceutical, Inc.; Biovitrum AB; BloodCenter of Wisconsin; Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association; Bone Marrow Foundation; Buchanan Family Foundation; CaridianBCT; Celgene Corporation; CellGenix, GmbH; Children’s Leukemia Research Association; ClinImmune Labs; CTI Clinical Trial and Consulting Services; Eisai, Inc.; Genentech, Inc.; Genzyme Corporation; Histogenetics, Inc.; HKS Medical Information Systems; Hospira, Inc.; Kirin Brewery Co., Ltd.; The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society; Merck & Company; The Medical College of Wisconsin; Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; Miller Pharmacal Group; Milliman USA, Inc.; Miltenyi Biotec, Inc.; National Marrow Donor Program; Nature Publishing Group; Novartis Oncology; Oncology Nursing Society; Osiris Therapeutics, Inc.; Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc.; Pall Life Sciences; Pfizer Inc; Schering Corporation; Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals; Soligenix, Inc.; StemCyte, Inc.; StemSoft Software, Inc.; Sysmex America, Inc.; THERAKOS, Inc.; Vidacare Corporation; ViraCor Laboratories; ViroPharma, Inc. and Wellpoint, Inc. The views expressed in this article do not reflect the official policy or position of the National Institute of Health, the Department of the Navy, the Department of Defense or any other agency of the US Government. We are grateful to Drs Manuel M Abecasis, Joseph Antin, Brian J Bolwell, Matthew Carabasi, Francisco Cervantes, Richard A Champlin, Edward Copelan, Gregory A Hale, Jane Liesveld, Mark R Litzow; Eduardo Olivaria and Harry C Schouten for their thoughtful comments and suggestions.

Keywords

  • CML
  • accelerated phase
  • allogeneic transplantation
  • blast phase
  • imatinib
  • outcomes

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