Psychological Distress in Sexual Minorities: Examining the Roles of Self-Concealment and Psychological Inflexibility

Kayla Leleux-Labarge, Arthur T. Hatton, Bradley Goodnight, Akihiko Masuda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present cross-sectional study investigated whether self-concealment and psychological inflexibility were associated with a range of psychological distress in sexual minorities and whether the associations between self-concealment and distress were established, in part, though psychological inflexibility. Participants were 100 college students (nfemale = 74) who self-identified their sexual orientations as “homosexual” or “bisexual.” Both self-concealment and psychological inflexibility were significantly and positively associated with general psychological distress, somatization, depression, and anxiety. Furthermore, results revealed that self-concealment is associated with these four distress variables at least partly through psychological inflexibility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)40-54
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Gay and Lesbian Mental Health
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Keywords

  • bisexual
  • distress
  • emotion regulation
  • experiential avoidance
  • gay
  • lesbian
  • psychological inflexibility
  • self-concealment
  • sexual minority

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