Psychometric testing of the Iceland Health Care Practitioner Illness Beliefs Questionnaire among school nurses

Erla Kolbrun Svavarsdottir, Wendy Looman, Gudny Bergthora Tryggvadottir, Ann E Garwick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Beliefs have been found to have an effect on how people deal with illness. Therefore, knowing healthcare practitioners’ beliefs about specific high frequency illnesses are vital when caring for vulnerable populations such as school-age children with chronic illnesses or disorders. Aim: To psychometrically test the Iceland Health Care Practitioner Illness Beliefs Questionnaire for healthcare professionals who are working with families of school-age children with asthma and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Design: The Iceland Health Care Practitioner Illness Beliefs Questionnaire is a 7-item Likert-type instrument with four additional open-ended questions that was developed from the Iceland Family Illness Belief Questionnaire. The questionnaire is designed to measure a provider's beliefs about their understanding of the meaning of the illness situation for families. The questionnaire was administered to 162 school nurses in Iceland and the state of Minnesota. Method: Two condition-specific versions of the Iceland Health Care Practitioner Illness Beliefs Questionnaire were developed in this study: one to measure beliefs about families of children with asthma and one to measure beliefs about families of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Higher scores on the questionnaire indicate that healthcare professionals are more confident in their illness beliefs. After initial development, the questionnaire was translated into English. Participants completed the questionnaire using an online survey platform and parallel study procedures in both countries. Results: Based on exploratory factor analysis using principal component analysis, the Iceland Health Care Practitioner Illness Beliefs Questionnaire was found to have a one-factor solution with good construct validity (Cronbach's α = 0.91). Confirmatory factor analysis supported the one-factor solution (Cronbach's α = 0.91). Conclusion: This instrument is a promising tool for measuring illness beliefs among healthcare practitioners in clinical and research settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)261-269
Number of pages9
JournalScandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding was provided with grants from the Icelandic Nursing Association, the scientific fund at the University of Iceland, and the School of Nursing Foundation, University of Minnesota. Study data were collected and managed using REDCap electronic data capture tools hosted at the University of Minnesota, supported by award Number UL1TR000114 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Center for Research Resources or the National Institutes of Health. No conflict of interest has been declared by the authors.

Funding Information:
Funding was provided with grants from the Icelandic Nursing Association, the scientific fund at the University of Iceland, and the School of Nursing Foundation, University of Minnesota. Study data were collected and managed using REDCap electronic data capture tools hosted at the University of Minnesota, supported by award Number UL1TR000114 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Center for Research Resources or the National Institutes of Health. No conflict of interest has been declared by the authors. The authors want to thank the school nurses who participated in the study for taking their time to share their illness beliefs as well as participating in this international study. Special thanks go to Ragnheidur Osk Erlendsdottir RN, MSC, who organised the data collection in Iceland. Camille Brown and Kristin Swartz contributed research assistance to the creation of the online versions of the questionnaires and administration through REDCap.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science

Keywords

  • instrument development
  • psychometric testing and healthcare practitioners's illness beliefs

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