Racial Differences in the Association of Coronary Calcified Plaque With Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study and Hypertension Genetic Epidemiology Network

Weihong Tang, Donna K. Arnett, Michael A. Province, Cora E. Lewis, Kari North, J. Jeffrey Carr, James S. Pankow, Paul N. Hopkins, Richard B. Devereux, Jemma B. Wilk, Lynne Wagenknecht

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13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Studies have reported a lower burden of calcified atherosclerotic plaque in coronary arteries in African-Americans than in whites. Findings from autopsy studies of sudden cardiac death have suggested a link between left ventricular hypertrophy and severity of coronary atherosclerosis. Echocardiograms and cardiac computed tomograms were analyzed in 334 African-American (84% hypertensive) and 196 white (66% hypertensive) adults with no history of coronary heart disease or revascularization procedures at study entry. The relation of coronary artery calcium (CAC) score to left ventricular mass and left ventricular mass indexed to body surface area was assessed by Spearman's correlations and mixed linear models. Covariates included age, gender, field center, weight, height, systolic blood pressure, number of antihypertensive medications, diabetes, total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and current smoking and alcohol consumption. In African-Americans, a significant and independent association between CAC score and left ventricular mass or left ventricular mass indexed to body surface area was present with the 2 analytic strategies. Spearman's correlation coefficients for CAC score with left ventricular mass and left ventricular mass indexed to body surface area were 0.14 (p = 0.015) and 0.13 (p = 0.025), respectively, after multivariable adjustment. In whites, the associations of CAC score with measurements of left ventricular mass were weaker and only marginally significant in mixed linear models. In conclusion, these findings suggest that CAC reflects a different risk burden between African-Americans and whites, and future studies examining the prognostic implications of CAC in African-Americans should consider the potential association between CAC and left ventricular hypertrophy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1441-1448
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume97
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 2006

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The Family Heart Study was supported by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI; Bethesda, Maryland) Cooperative Agreement Grants U01 HL 67893, U01 HL67894, U01 HL67895, U01 HL67896, U01 HL67897, U01 HL67898, U01 HL67899, U01 HL67900, U01 HL67901, U01 HL67902, U01 HL56563, U01 HL56564, U01 HL56565, U01 HL56566, U01 HL56567, U01 HL56568, and U01 HL56569. The Hypertension Genetic Epidemiology Network (HyperGEN) was supported by NHLBI Grant R01 HL55673 and cooperative agreements (U10) with the NHLBI: HL54471, HL54515 (UT), HL54472, HL54496 (MN), HL54473 (MO), HL54495 (AL), and HL54509 (NC). Dr. Tang was supported in part by the NHLBI Training Grant T32-HL07972. Coronary artery disease

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