Relationship of inappropriate drug prescribing to increased length of hospital stay.

D. E. Knapp, D. A. Knappp, M. K. Speedie, D. M. Yaeger, C. L. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

The relationship of inappropriate drug prescribing to increased length of hospital stay was studied. The medical records of 77 cases of pyelonephritis were reviewed retrospectively. Appropriateness of antimicrobial drug therapy was judged by three types of explicit screening criteria: drug-specific, patient-specific, and match of drug to infecting organism. Patients whose therapy passed all the criteria were hospitalized, on the average, two days less than those whose therapy failed one or more of the criteria. This was a significant difference (p less than 0.05). Age, seriousness of the pyelonephritis, or method of payment appeared to have no significant moderating effect on this result. However, the increased length of stay may not have been associated with only inappropriate prescribing, because the inappropriately prescribing physicians kept their patients hospitalized longer beyond the point of symptom remission than did the appropriately prescribing physicians. The study suggest that successful interventions for improving drug therapy could result in large cost savings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1334-1337
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Hospital Pharmacy
Volume36
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1 1979

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