Role of moisture in maillard browning reaction rate in intermediate moisture foods: Comparing solvent phase and matrix properties

C. P. Sherwin, T. P. Labuza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

In intermediate-moisture foods, a mechanism describing how moisture affects chemical reaction rate is unknown. Previously, research showed glycol addition to model systems allowed high rates of nonenzymatic browning below the monolayer moisture value and an aw of 0.2. These works were replicated, focusing on a mechanism of either plasticization or reactant dissolution. Tg curves showed plasticization increased with added glycerol and sorbitol. The maximum rate of nonezymatic browning with glycerol occurred at an aw = 0.25 and was 1.5 times higher than the control (aw = 0.65). Sorbitol showed rates similar to the control. plasticization and aw were poor predictors of reaction rate. Dissolution of glucose in glycerol explained the effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)588-593
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of food science
Volume68
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 2003

Keywords

  • Glass transition
  • Humectant
  • Maillard browning
  • Nonenzymatic browning
  • Plasticizer

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