Secondary traumatic stress, burnout, and compassion satisfaction in a sample of spoken-language interpreters

Christopher J Mehus, Emily Becher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

The primary aim of this study was to better understand levels of secondary traumatic stress, burnout, and compassion satisfaction within the spoken-language interpreter community. An online survey was conducted utilizing the Professional Quality of Life measure with scales for each of these constructs. Responses from the 119 respondents show high levels of secondary traumatic stress but also high levels of compassion satisfaction relative to population norms. A secondary aim was to determine the relationship between each of these scales and trauma history, gender, and refugee status. None of these relationships were significant at the preset alpha levels. In light of our primary results, clinical agencies should consider how interpreters are being supported in trauma-related work. Future focus groups and semistructured interviews will be conducted with survey participants to explore what form this support could take.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)249-254
Number of pages6
JournalTraumatology
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Keywords

  • Burnout
  • Compassion fatigue
  • Compassion satisfaction
  • Interpreter
  • Secondary traumatic stress

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