Selective removal of ovarian cancer cells from human ascites fluid using magnetic nanoparticles

Kenneth E. Scarberry, Erin B. Dickerson, Z. John Zhang, Benedict B. Benigno, John F. McDonald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

57 Scopus citations

Abstract

A majority of ovarian cancer metastases result from the shedding of malignant cells from the primary tumor into the abdominal cavity. Free-floating cancer cells in serous effusions of late-stage ovarian cancer patients may spread to internal organs, making effective treatment extremely difficult. Selective removal of ovarian cancer cells from serous fluids may abate metastasis and improve long-term prognoses. We have already shown that superparamagnetic nanoparticles conjugated to an ephrin-A1 mimetic peptide with a high affinity for the EphA2 receptor can be used to capture and remove cultured human ovarian cancer cells from the peritonea of experimental mice. Here we demonstrate the potential clinical utility of the methodology by in vitro capture and isolation of cancer cells from the ascites fluid of ovarian cancer patients. From the Clinical Editor: Ovarian cancer metastases usually are the result of shedding of malignant cells from the primary tumor into the abdominal cavity. In this paper, a novel nanotechnology-based method is demonstrated for the in vitro capture and isolation of cancer cells from the ascites fluid of ovarian cancer patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)399-408
Number of pages10
JournalNanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010

Keywords

  • Magnetic nanoparticles
  • Metastatic cancer therapy
  • Ovarian cancer

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