Small food store retailers' views on healthy food retail policy in response to a local staple foods ordinance

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Abstract

Objective: Our objectives were to explore attitudes regarding food retail policy and government regulation among managers of small food stores and examine whether manager views changed due to the 2014 Minneapolis Staple Foods Ordinance, a city policy requiring retailers to stock specific healthy products. Design: Manager interviewer-administered surveys were used to assess views on food retail policy four times from 2014 to 2017. We examined baseline views across manager and store and neighbourhood characteristics using cross-sectional regression analyses and examined changes over time using mixed regression models. In 2017, open-ended survey questions asked about manager insights on the Minneapolis Staple Foods Ordinance. Setting: Minneapolis, MN, where the ordinance was enacted, and St. Paul, MN, a control community, USA. Participants: Managers from 147 small food retail stores. Results: At baseline, 48 % of managers were likely to support a policy requiring stores to stock healthy foods/beverages, 67·5 % of managers were likely to support voluntary programmes to help retailers stock healthy foods and 23·7 % agreed government regulation of business is good/necessary. There was a significant increase in overall support for food retail policies and voluntary programmes from 2014 to 2017 (P < 0·01); however, neither increase differed by city, suggesting no differential impact from the ordinance. Minneapolis store managers reported some challenges with ordinance compliance and offered suggestions for how local government could provide support. Conclusions: Findings suggest that managers of small food retail stores are becoming increasingly amenable to healthy food policies; yet, challenges need to be addressed to ensure healthy food is available to all customers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1934-1940
Number of pages7
JournalPublic health nutrition
Volume24
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Acknowledgements: The authors would like acknowledge the valuable input and support provided by Ms. Kristen Klingler, Ms. Nora Gordon and their colleagues at the Minneapolis Health Department. In addition, we would like to thank Ms. Stacey Moe and Pamela Carr-Manthe for their leadership in data collection efforts, Mr. Bill Baker for his programming support and the many data collectors who were involved in this effort. Finally, we would like to thank the retailers who participated in this study and gave us permission to assess their stores and interview their customers. Financial support: Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01DK104348 (Principal Investigator: M.N.L.); and the Health Promotion and Disease. Prevention Research Center supported by Cooperative Agreement Number 5U48DP005022 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Principal Investigator: M.N.L.). Further support was provided to C.M.M. as a predoctoral fellow and M.R.W. as a postdoctoral fellow by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number T32DK083250 (Principal Investigator: R. Jeffery). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Funding agencies had no role in the design, analysis or writing of this article. Conflict of interest: None. Authorship: C.M. M.: formulating the research question(s), formulating the analysis plan, analysing data and writing the manuscript. M.R.W.: formulating the research question(s), formulating the analysis plan, analysing data and writing the manuscript. K.M.L.: formulating the research question(s), formulating the analysis plan, analysing data and manuscript revision. L.H.: formulating the research question(s), formulating the analysis plan, designing the study and manuscript revision. D.J.E.: formulating the research question(s), formulating the analysis plan, designing the study and manuscript revision. M.N.L.: formulating the research question(s), formulating the analysis plan, analysing data, designing the study and manuscript revision. Ethics of human subject participation: This study was conducted according to the guidelines laid down in the Declaration of Helsinki, and all procedures involving study participants were approved by The University of Minnesota Institutional Review Board. Verbal informed consent was obtained from all subjects. Verbal consent was witnessed and formally recorded.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Cambridge University Press. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Corner stores
  • Food retail
  • Policy views
  • Store managers

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

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