Speed of printing familiar and unfamiliar passages in second-, third-, and fourth-grade students

Leann Shore, Carolyn Dorfman, Barbara Kelii

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine current handwriting speed in Grades 2, 3, and 4. Method. Students copied two documents, each for two minutes. The first document was read for familiarity and the second was an unfamiliar passage. Results. In general, girls wrote at a similar speed to boys; however, girls wrote more legibly. There was no statistical significance in speed or legibility between right- or left-handed students. Students in higher grades wrote faster than students in lower grades. Conclusion. Understanding typical norms for handwriting speed and legibility may help practitioners better evaluate student needs. The researchers found that students printed more quickly on unfamiliar writing tasks than on familiar tasks. The same students, however, wrote less legibly. This study supports a known inverse relationship between speed and legibility. When students write more quickly, there is a decline in legibility. Conversely, writing more neatly will likely result in slower writing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)159-170
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Occupational Therapy, Schools, and Early Intervention
Volume2
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

Keywords

  • Handwriting
  • Legibility
  • Printing
  • Speed

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