Status functions, collective intentionality: Matters of trust for geospatial information sharing

Francis Harvey

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

A GIS coordinator for a U.S. city complains about data sharing metadata with a single word: "headaches." He underscores the function of metadata in supporting the process of finding a collective understanding of what the data can be reliably used for. In John Searle's philosophical work on social reality, this coordinator articulates the struggle to create and maintain the status functions and collective intentionality required for successful data sharing. Each technical solution to data sharing can fail to ensure that the meaning of the shared data is understood. Data sharing must move one rung higher and become information sharing, which requires the collective recognition of status functions and the creation of collective intentionality. Integral to successful information sharing is the creation of an environment of trust that ensures that function recognition occurs. In this paper I examine cases that highlight trust as a measure of status function recognition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGeographic, Information Science - 4th International Conference, GIScience 2006, Proceedings
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages145-152
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)3540445269, 9783540445265
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006
Event4th International Conference on Geographic, Information Science, GIScience 2006 - Munster, Germany
Duration: Sep 20 2006Sep 23 2006

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume4197 LNCS
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Other

Other4th International Conference on Geographic, Information Science, GIScience 2006
CountryGermany
CityMunster
Period9/20/069/23/06

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