Students' intuitive understanding of promisingness and promisingness judgments to facilitate knowledge advancement

Bodong Chen, Marlene Scardamalia, Monica Resendes, Maria Chuy, Carl Bereiter

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

The ability to identify promising ideas is an important but obscure and undeveloped aspect of knowledge building. The goal of this research was to examine the extent to which young students can make promisingness judgments and, as a result, engage in more effective knowledge building. Toward this end we embedded a design experiment in a Grade 3 classroom. In this experiment students were engaged in discussion and reflection of the concept of promisingness and used a Promising Ideas tool to identify promising ideas in their written online discourse. They used the tool for two refinements of idea selections to focus ongoing community dialogue. Results suggest that students as young as 8 years of age can make promisingness judgments that facilitate knowledge advancement in their work. These results inform future work in classroom interventions and tool development to promote promisingness judgments in collaborative knowledge building.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication10th International Conference of the Learning Sciences
Subtitle of host publicationThe Future of Learning, ICLS 2012 - Proceedings
Pages111-118
Number of pages8
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012
Event10th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: The Future of Learning, ICLS 2012 - Sydney, NSW, Australia
Duration: Jul 2 2012Jul 6 2012

Publication series

Name10th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: The Future of Learning, ICLS 2012 - Proceedings
Volume1

Other

Other10th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: The Future of Learning, ICLS 2012
Country/TerritoryAustralia
CitySydney, NSW
Period7/2/127/6/12

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