Suboptimal control of glycemia, blood pressure, and LDL cholesterol in overweight adults with diabetes: the Look AHEAD Study

Alain G. Bertoni, Jeanne M. Clark, Patricia Feeney, Susan Z. Yanovski, John Bantle, Brenda Montgomery, Monika M. Safford, William H. Herman, Steven Haffner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

62 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The characteristics associated with meeting goals for glycemia, blood pressure (BP), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol for participants with diabetes were examined. Methods: Baseline information on demographics, medical history, and anthropometry, as well as on hemoglobin A1c, BP, and LDL cholesterol levels, was measured in 5145 participants of Look AHEAD, a multicenter randomized trial performed to determine whether long-term weight loss and increased physical fitness reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) in overweight and obese individuals with type 2 diabetes. Logistic regression was used to analyze these cross-sectional data to ascertain associations between participant characteristics and attainment of risk factor goals [hemoglobin A1c <7.0%, BP <130/80 mmHg, and LDL <100 mg/dl]. Results: The study population had a mean age of 58.7 years and a mean body mass index of 36.0 kg/m2. Of the total number of participants, 59.5% were female, 36.8% were of ethnic/racial minority, and 87.3% were on diabetes medications. Upon enrollment, 45.8% had hemoglobin A1c<7.0%, 51.7% had BP<130/80 mmHg, and 37.2% had LDL<100 mg/dl. All three goals were met by only 10.1%. We found consistent evidence for differences in risk factor control by age, gender, race/ethnicity, degree of obesity, education, income, CVD, source of medical care, and medication use. In multivariable analysis, African-American race, increasing degree of obesity, insulin use, and nonutilization of a lipid-lowering agent were associated with not meeting all risk factor goals. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that numerous baseline characteristics are associated with suboptimal control of these cardiovascular risk factors among overweight and obese adults with diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Diabetes and Its Complications
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2008

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Additional support was received from The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions Bayview General Clinical Research Center (M01-RR-02719); the Massachusetts General Hospital Mallinckrodt General Clinical Research Center (M01-RR-01066); the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center General Clinical Research Center (M01 RR00051) and Clinical Nutrition Research Unit (P30 DK48520); the University of Tennessee at Memphis General Clinical Research Center (M01RR00211-40); the University of Pittsburgh General Clinical Research Center (M01 RR000056 44) and National Institutes of Health grant (DK 046204); and the University of Washington/VA Puget Sound Health Care System Medical Research Service, Department of Veterans Affairs.

Funding Information:
This study was supported by the US Department of Health and Human Services through the following cooperative agreements from the National Institutes of Health: DK57136, DK57149, DK56990, DK57177, DK57171, DK57151, DK57182, DK57131, DK57002, DK57078, DK57154, DK57178, DK57219, DK57008, DK57135, and DK56992. The following federal agencies have contributed support: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; National Institute of Nursing Research; National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities; Office of Research on Women's Health; and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This research was supported, in part, by the Intramural Research Program of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Cholesterol
  • Hemoglobin A1c
  • Risk factor control

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