The bacterial communities of full-scale biologically active, granular activated carbon filters are stable and diverse and potentially contain novel ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms

Timothy M. LaPara, Katheryn Hope Wilkinson, Jacqueline M. Strait, Raymond M. Hozalski, Michael J. Sadowksy, Matthew J. Hamilton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

The bacterial community composition of the full-scale biologically active, granular activated carbon (BAC) filters operated at the St. Paul Regional Water Services (SPRWS) was investigated using Illumina MiSeq analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments. These bacterial communities were consistently diverse (Shannon index, >4.4; richness estimates, >1,500 unique operational taxonomic units [OTUs]) throughout the duration of the 12-month study period. In addition, only modest shifts in the quantities of individual bacterial populations were observed; of the 15 most prominent OTUs, the most highly variable population (a Variovorax sp.) modulated less than 13-fold over time and less than 8-fold from filter to filter. The most prominent population in the profiles was a Nitrospira sp., representing 13 to 21% of the community. Interestingly, very few of the known ammonia- oxidizing bacteria (AOB; <0.07%) and no ammonia-oxidizing Archaea were detected in the profiles. Quantitative PCR of amoA genes, however, suggested that AOB were prominent in the bacterial communities (amoA/16S rRNA gene ratio, 1 to 10%). We conclude, therefore, that the BAC filters at the SPRWS potentially contained significant numbers of unidentified and novel ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms that possess amoA genes similar to those of previously described AOB.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6864-6872
Number of pages9
JournalApplied and environmental microbiology
Volume81
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015, American Society for Microbiology.

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