The design of a study to assess occult-blood screening for colon cancer

Victor A. Gilbertsen, Timothy R. Church, Francis J. Grewe, Jack S. Mandel, Richard B. McHugh, Leonard M. Schuman, Stanley E. Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

It is our experience to date that large numbers of high risk individuals can be induced to use the self-administered Hemoccult test on a periodic basis. The study will determine not only whether a significant reduction in mortality can be effected by such periodic screening for colorectal cancer, but will also attempt to arrive at such parameters as the optimal period for rescreening by estimating mean lead time gained at different rescreening intervals using the methodology of Zelen and Feinleib [10] and Prorok [11, 12]. In addition, screening at two different intervals (Groups I and II) will yield empirical data about the effect of screening frequency on mortality and survivorship. Combining these methodologies may yield new information on optimal screening frequency. Such information could then be used to set up screening programs which would significantly reduce mortality from colorectal cancer on a nation-wide basis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)107-114
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Chronic Diseases
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1980

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
*The research described herein is supported by Contract No. NCI-CB-53862 from the National Cancer Institute. tWork completed during the tenure of an American Cancer Society-Eleanor Roosevelt--International Fellowship awarded by the International Union Against Cancer.

Copyright:
Copyright 2014 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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