The Effect of Strong Versus Weak Evidence on the Assessment of Race Stereotypic and Race Nonstereotypic Crimes

Randall A. Gordon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effects of defendant race, type of crime, and strength of evidence on the perception and evaluation of criminal offenses were examined. Consistent with past research, defendants accused of race stereotypic crimes were more likely to be perceived as guilty and as more typical offenders than were defendants accused of race nonstereotypic crimes. The strength of evidence supplied to subjects did moderate the interaction between defendant race and type of crime on some of the punishment items. These findings and their implications for future related research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)734-749
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume23
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1993

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