The effects of childhood disruptive disorder comorbidity on P3 event-related brain potentials in preadolescents with ADHD

Henry H. Yoon, William G. Iacono, Stephen M. Malone, Edward M. Bernat, Matt McGue

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study examined the degree to which the P300 component of the visual brain event-related potential and associated task performance deficits often observed in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are attributable to comorbid childhood disruptive disorders using a community sample of 11-year olds from the Minnesota Twin Family Study. Subjects were divided into "ADHD-pure" (ADHD without oppositional defiant disorder, ODD, or conduct disorder, CD), "ADHD-comorbid" (ADHD with ODD or CD), and comparison (no childhood disruptive disorder) groups using DSM-III-R diagnoses. Results showed that ADHD-comorbid but not ADHD-pure subjects displayed significant P3 amplitude reduction and poorer task performance compared to controls. No group effects for P3 latency or reaction time were seen. Although ADHD-comorbid children had marginally more ADHD symptoms compared to ADHD-pure children, this did not account for their reduced P3, suggesting that the observed neurobehavioral deficits reflected the effects of co-occurring childhood disruptive disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)329-336
Number of pages8
JournalBiological Psychology
Volume79
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2008

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by NIH grants DA 13240, DA 05147, DA 024417, and AA09367.

Copyright:
Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • ADHD
  • Childhood disruptive disorders
  • Comorbidity
  • Disinhibition
  • Event-related potentials
  • P3

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