The Effects of Cognitive: Linguistic Variables and Language Experience on Behavioural and Kinematic Performances in Nonword Learning

Jayanthi Sasisekaran, Sanford Weisberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of cognitive-linguistic variables and language experience on behavioral and kinematic measures of nonword learning in young adults. Group 1 consisted of thirteen participants who spoke American English as the first and only language. Group 2 consisted of seven participants with varying levels of proficiency in a second language. Logistic regression of the percent of correct productions revealed short-term memory to be a significant contributor. The bilingual group showed better performance compared to the monolinguals. Linear regression of the kinematic data revealed that the short-term memory variable contributed significantly to movement coordination. Differences were not observed between the bilingual and the monolingual speakers in kinematic performance. Nonword properties including syllable length and complexity influenced both behavioral and kinematic performance. The findings supported the observation that nonword repetition is multiply determined in adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)175-190
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Psycholinguistic Research
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2013

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Acknowledgments This study was funded by an NIH Research Grant R03 (Award R03DC010047) to the first author. We thank our participants. We acknowledge Kalli Nielsen, Michael Peterson, and Katie Lauritzen for data collection and analysis, Dr. Edward Carney for technical assistance.

Keywords

  • Cognitive-linguistic
  • Lip aperture variability
  • Nonword repetition

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