The effects of hyperoxic injury and antioxidant vitamins on death and proliferation of human small airway epithelial cells

Harumi Jyonouchi, Sining Sun, Toichi Abiru, Satanoon Chareancholvanich, David H. Ingbar

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54 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previously it was reported that hyperoxia induced death of the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line (A549 cells) by necrosis, not by apoptosis. This study examined proliferation and death of untransformed human small airway epithelial (SAE) cells in normoxia or hyperoxia in comparison with A549 cells. We tested the hypothesis that SAE cells respond differently to hyperoxic injury than do A549 cells. We measured total cell number and viability, thymidine incorporation (SAE cells only), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, and apoptotic changes as markers for cell proliferation and death. Protective effects of anti-oxidant vitamins also were examined in SAE cells. In normoxia, subconfluent SAE cells had less apoptosis and fewer detached cells, but higher thymidine incorporation than did near-confluent cells. Hyperoxia suppressed thymidine incorporation and augmented apoptosis in both subconfluent and near-confluent SAE cells. Hyperoxia decreased the total cell number only in subconfluence, whereas SAE cell viability declined with hyperoxia in near confluence, but not in subconfluence. For SAE cells, necrosis assessed by LDH release was minimal in all conditions and was not augmented by hyperoxia in SAE cells. In contrast, normoxic A549 cells proliferated more rapidly than did SAE cells with a large number of cells detached during the culture. A549 cells underwent necrotic cell death under confluent or in hyperoxic conditions, but had much less apoptotic cell death. In SAE cells, vitamin E partially prevented the decline of thymidine incorporation with hyperoxia in subconfluence and protected against apoptotic changes with hyperoxia in both subconfluent and near-confluent conditions. Vitamin C prevented apoptosis with hyperoxia only in near-confluent SAE cells. Thus. SAE cells maintained balanced apoptosis and cell proliferation that were altered by cell density and hyperoxia and demonstrated very little necrosis with hyperoxia. Although A549 cells underwent cell death mainly by necrosis, they also were influenced by cell density and hyperoxia. Cell density also determined specific antioxidant vitamin protection in SAE cells. Jyonouchi, H., S. Sun, T. Abiru, S. Chareancholvanich, and D. H. Ingbar. 1998. The effects of hyperoxic injury and antioxidant vitamins on death and proliferation of human small airway epithelial cells. Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. 19:426-436.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)426-436
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican journal of respiratory cell and molecular biology
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

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