The effects of message framing and ethnic targeting on mammography use among low-income women

Tamera R. Schneider, Peter Salovey, Anne Marie Apanovitch, Judith Pizarro, Danielle McCarthy, Janet Zullo, Alexander J Rothman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

173 Scopus citations

Abstract

The authors examined the effects that differently framed and targeted health messages have on persuading low-income women to obtain screening mammograms. The authors recruited 752 women over 40 years of age from community health clinics and public housing developments and assigned the women randomly to view videos that were either gain or loss framed and either targeted specifically to their ethnic groups or multicultural. Loss-framed, multicultural messages were most persuasive. The advantage of loss-framed, multicultural messages was especially apparent for Anglo women and Latinas but not for African American women. These effects were stronger after 6 months than after 12 months.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)256-266
Number of pages11
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Framing
  • Mammography
  • Persuasion

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