The Impact of a Biopsy Based 17-Gene Genomic Prostate Score on Treatment Recommendations in Men with Newly Diagnosed Clinically Prostate Cancer Who are Candidates for Active Surveillance

Ketan K. Badani, Michael J. Kemeter, Phillip G. Febbo, H. Jeffrey Lawrence, Béla S. Denes, Megan P. Rothney, Michael B. Rothberg, Gordon A. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: The biopsy based 17-gene GPS was clinically validated to predict the likelihood of adverse surgical pathology in men with NCCN® very low, low or low-intermediate risk prostate cancer. We performed a prospective study to assess the impact of incorporating GPS into treatment recommendations in 3 high volume urology practices. Methods: Men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer meeting specific NCCN criteria were prospectively enrolled in the trial. Biopsy tissue was analyzed. Urologists indicated treatment recommendations on questionnaires administered before and after GPS. The primary study objectives were to assess all changes in treatment modality and/or treatment intensity after GPS. Results: A total of 158 men were included in analysis, including 35, 71 and 52 at NCCN very low, low and low-intermediate risk. Biological risk predicted by GPS differed from NCCN clinical risk alone in 61 men (39%). Overall 18% of recommendations between active surveillance and immediate treatment changed after GPS. The relative increase in recommendations for active surveillance was 24% (absolute change 41% to 51%). In 41 of 158 men (26%) modality and/or intensity recommendations changed after GPS, including 25, 14 and 2 in whom recommendation intensity decreased, increased and were equivocal, respectively. All changes were directionally consistent with GPS. The NCCN low risk group showed the greatest absolute recommendation change after GPS (37%). In 17 of 57 men (30%) the initial recommendation of radical prostatectomy was changed to active surveillance after GPS. Urologists indicated greater confidence and found that incorporating GPS was useful in 85% and 79% of cases, respectively, including when biological risk confirmed the clinical risk category. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the 17-gene GPS influenced treatment recommendations among urologists and provided increased confidence in these recommendations in patients at NCCN very low to low-intermediate risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-189
Number of pages9
JournalUrology Practice
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc.

Keywords

  • Biological markers
  • Molecular diagnostic techniques
  • Prostatic neoplasms
  • Risk assessment

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