The limits of genetic influence: A behavior-genetic analysis of infant-caregiver relationship quality and temperament

Glenn I. Roisman, R. Chris Fraley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

This report presents data on 9-month-old twin pairs (n MZ = 172; n DZ = 333) from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, demonstrating that the role of genetic variation among infants is trivial and the shared and nonshared environment is substantial in accounting for the observed quality of infant-caregiver relationships. In contrast, maternal reports of temperament were best accounted for by genetic variation and nonshared environmental influences. Interestingly, however, shared environmental effects were documented for observations of temperament. Consistent with a growing database, the current study calls into question the ubiquity of heritability effects in all domains of psychological inquiry. It also bolsters consensus in the field of developmental psychology that shared environmental effects are not as elusive as had once been thought.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1656-1667
Number of pages12
JournalChild development
Volume77
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2006

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