The Nature of Supportive Listening II: The Role of Verbal Person Centeredness and Nonverbal Immediacy

Graham D. Bodie, Susanne M. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examines an untested research assumption that a key component of supportive communication is active listening. Participants (N = 383) viewed a 5-minute conversation featuring a person who disclosed an emotionally upsetting event to a confederate who provided emotional support that varied in verbal person centeredness (VPC) and nonverbal immediacy (NVI). Participants then evaluated the extent to which the support provider was an active listener. Results showed that helpers who used higher levels of both VPC and NVI were rated as better listeners than those who used less person-centered and immediate support, although effect sizes were small. Results were also dependent on the operationalization of active listening.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)250-269
Number of pages20
JournalWestern Journal of Communication
Volume76
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Graham D. Bodie is Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Studies, The Louisiana State University. Susanne M. Jones is Associate Professor in the Department of Communication Studies, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. Preparation of this manuscript was partially supported by a Summer Research Grant awarded to Graham Bodie from the College of Arts & Sciences at LSU. A previous version of this manuscript was awarded Top Conference Paper at the 2011 meeting of the International Listening Association, Johnson City, TN. Correspondence to: Graham D. Bodie, Department of Communication Studies, LSU, 136 Coates Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA. E-mail: gbodie@lsu.edu

Keywords

  • Active Listening
  • Comforting
  • Nonverbal Immediacy
  • Social Support
  • Stress

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The Nature of Supportive Listening II: The Role of Verbal Person Centeredness and Nonverbal Immediacy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this