The North American invasive zooplanktivore Bythotrephes longimanus is less hypoxia-tolerant than the native Leptodora kindtii

Michael L. Sorensen, Donn K. Branstrator

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

The predatory cladoceran Bythotrephes longimanus (spiny water flea) has been invading lakes and damaging food webs across the central part of North America since the early 1980s. To understand its niche and that of the taxonomically related and native predatory cladoceran Leptodora kindtii, we investigated species survival after 12 h exposures to low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in the laboratory. Bythotrephes longimanus (n = 690) exhibited a hypoxia tolerance limit (LC50) of 1.65 mg·L−1 DO (95% confidence interval: 1.59, 1.72 mg·L−1) and was significantly less tolerant of hypoxia than L. kindtii (n = 380), which exhibited an LC50 of 0.58 mg·L−1 DO (0.51, 0.65 mg·L−1). These lab-based physiological results are consistent with landscape-scale observations that B. longimanus successfully invades primarily mesotrophic and oligotrophic lakes, while L. kindtii inhabits a wider range of lakes that includes eutrophic ones. Climate change throughout the 21st century may increase the occurrence and severity of hypoxia in the hypolimnia of lakes and may provide a growing barrier to B. longimanus invasion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)824-832
Number of pages9
JournalCanadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Volume74
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017, Canadian Science Publishing. All rights reserved.

Copyright:
Copyright 2017 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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