The relationship between local clean indoor air policies and smoking behaviours in minnesota youth

E. G. Klein, J. L. Forster, D. J. Erickson, L. A. Lytle, B. Schillo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: While clean indoor air (CIA) policies are intended to reduce exposure to second-hand smoke in the workplace, restrictions in public workplaces have the potential to discourage youth smoking. There is growing evidence from cross-sectional and ecological studies, but limited evidence from longitudinal studies that this is so. Objective: To evaluate the association between local CIA policies and smoking behaviours among Minnesota youth over time. Design, setting and subjects: A cohort of 4233 Minnesota youths, ages 11 to 16 at baseline, was interviewed via telephone for 6 years (2000-2006). Individual, family and community level variables were collected from participants every 6 months. A generalised estimating equation (GEE) logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between CIA policies and past-month smoking in youth over time. The analysis was controlled for potential confounders at individual and community levels. Results: There was not significant association between CIA policies and youth smoking behaviours in the multivariate analyses. At the individual level, parental smoking significantly increased the odds of smoking nearly 40% and close friend smoking increased the odds of past-month smoking by nearly 100% for each close friend. Banning smoking in the home was significantly associated with a 12% reduction in the odds of past-month smoking. Conclusion: After accounting for other community and individual level factors known to be associated with youth smoking, there was no significant association between CIA policies and past-month smoking for youth over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)132-137
Number of pages6
JournalTobacco control
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2009

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