The social implications of participant choice on adherence to Isonaizid Preventive Therapy (IPT): A follow-up study to high completion rates in Eswatini

S. W. Grande, L. V. Adams, T. S.B. Maseko, E. A. Talbot, D. DeGijsel, J. Mikal, Z. Z. Simelane, A. Achili, M. Mkhontfo, S. M. Haumba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background Eswatini (formerly Swaziland) has one of the highest rates of TB and HIV co-disease in the world. Despite national efforts to improve service delivery and prevent TB and HIV transmission, rates remain high. A recent prospective, observational study of integrated, patientselected IPT delivery showed extraordinary improvements in IPT adherence, running counter to previous assumptions. This prompted the need to understand contextual and unseen study factors that contributed to high rates of adherence. Objective To investigate high rates of IPT adherence rates among people living with HIV who participated in an observational study comparing modes of IPT delivery. Methods Community-based participatory research guided the development of in-person administration of semi-structured questionnaires. Observational and field note data were analyzed. Qualitative data were analyzed using content analysis. Results We interviewed 150 participants and analyzed responses from the 136 who remembered being given a choice of their IPT delivery method. Fifty-seven percent were female and the median age was 42. Nearly 67% of participants chose to receive facility-based IPT. High rates of self-reported IPT treatment adherence were linked to four key concepts: 1) adherence was positively impacted by community education; 2) disclosure of status served to empower participant completion; 3) mode of delivery perceptions positively impacted adherence; and 4) choice of treatment delivery seen as helpful but not essential for treatment completion. Discussion Achieving higher rates of IPT adherence in Eswatini and similar rural areas requires community- engaged education and outreach in coordination with care delivery systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0232841
JournalPloS one
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2020

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

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