The Space Physics Environment Data Analysis System (SPEDAS)

V. Angelopoulos, P. Cruce, A. Drozdov, E. W. Grimes, N. Hatzigeorgiu, D. A. King, D. Larson, J. W. Lewis, J. M. McTiernan, D. A. Roberts, C. L. Russell, T. Hori, Y. Kasahara, A. Kumamoto, A. Matsuoka, Y. Miyashita, Y. Miyoshi, I. Shinohara, M. Teramoto, J. B. FadenA. J. Halford, M. McCarthy, R. M. Millan, J. G. Sample, D. M. Smith, L. A. Woodger, A. Masson, A. A. Narock, K. Asamura, T. F. Chang, C. Y. Chiang, Y. Kazama, K. Keika, S. Matsuda, T. Segawa, K. Seki, M. Shoji, S. W.Y. Tam, N. Umemura, B. J. Wang, S. Y. Wang, R. Redmon, J. V. Rodriguez, H. J. Singer, J. Vandegriff, S. Abe, M. Nose, A. Shinbori, Y. M. Tanaka, S. UeNo, L. Andersson, P. Dunn, C. Fowler, J. S. Halekas, T. Hara, Y. Harada, C. O. Lee, R. Lillis, D. L. Mitchell, M. R. Argall, K. Bromund, J. L. Burch, I. J. Cohen, M. Galloy, B. Giles, A. N. Jaynes, O. Le Contel, M. Oka, T. D. Phan, B. M. Walsh, J. Westlake, F. D. Wilder, S. D. Bale, R. Livi, M. Pulupa, P. Whittlesey, A. DeWolfe, B. Harter, E. Lucas, U. Auster, J. W. Bonnell, C. M. Cully, E. Donovan, R. E. Ergun, H. U. Frey, B. Jackel, A. Keiling, H. Korth, J. P. McFadden, Y. Nishimura, F. Plaschke, P. Robert, D. L. Turner, J. M. Weygand, R. M. Candey, R. C. Johnson, T. Kovalick, M. H. Liu, R. E. McGuire, Aaron W Breneman, K. Kersten, P. Schroeder

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

93 Scopus citations

Abstract

With the advent of the Heliophysics/Geospace System Observatory (H/GSO), a complement of multi-spacecraft missions and ground-based observatories to study the space environment, data retrieval, analysis, and visualization of space physics data can be daunting. The Space Physics Environment Data Analysis System (SPEDAS), a grass-roots software development platform (www.spedas.org), is now officially supported by NASA Heliophysics as part of its data environment infrastructure. It serves more than a dozen space missions and ground observatories and can integrate the full complement of past and upcoming space physics missions with minimal resources, following clear, simple, and well-proven guidelines. Free, modular and configurable to the needs of individual missions, it works in both command-line (ideal for experienced users) and Graphical User Interface (GUI) mode (reducing the learning curve for first-time users). Both options have “crib-sheets,” user-command sequences in ASCII format that can facilitate record-and-repeat actions, especially for complex operations and plotting. Crib-sheets enhance scientific interactions, as users can move rapidly and accurately from exchanges of technical information on data processing to efficient discussions regarding data interpretation and science. SPEDAS can readily query and ingest all International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP)-compatible products from the Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF), enabling access to a vast collection of historic and current mission data. The planned incorporation of Heliophysics Application Programmer’s Interface (HAPI) standards will facilitate data ingestion from distributed datasets that adhere to these standards. Although SPEDAS is currently Interactive Data Language (IDL)-based (and interfaces to Java-based tools such as Autoplot), efforts are under-way to expand it further to work with python (first as an interface tool and potentially even receiving an under-the-hood replacement). We review the SPEDAS development history, goals, and current implementation. We explain its “modes of use” with examples geared for users and outline its technical implementation and requirements with software developers in mind. We also describe SPEDAS personnel and software management, interfaces with other organizations, resources and support structure available to the community, and future development plans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number9
JournalSpace Science Reviews
Volume215
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The core SPEDAS team acknowledges support from NASA contract NNG17PZ01C (for SPEDAS community support) to UCLA, contract NNG04EB99C (as subcontract from SwRI for MMS SPEDAS plug-in development) to UCLA, and contract NAS5-02099 (THEMIS support of TDAS maintenance and SPEDAS infrastructure) to UCB, UCLA and BU. UCB also acknowledges support from NASA grant NNX16AP95G (for WIND 3DP work), NASA contract NNN06AA01C (for PSP/FIELDS work).

Funding Information:
ERG work was done by the ERG-Science Center operated by ISAS/JAXA and at ISEE/Nagoya University. ERG work was also partially supported by the GEMSIS project of ISEE (formerly STEL) at Nagoya University. Y. Miyoshi acknowledges support from Japan’s JSPS KAKENHI grants 15H05815, 15H05747, and 16H06286. Y. Kasahara acknowledges support from Japan’s JSPS KAKENHI grant 16H04056. S.-Y. Wang acknowledges support from Taiwan grants MOST 105-3111-Y-001-042, and MOST 106-2111-M-001-011, and C.-Y. Chiang and S.W.Y. Tam acknowledge support from Taiwan grant MOST 107-2111-M006-003.

Funding Information:
The core SPEDAS thanks the following individuals for their contributions to the formulation and content of SPEDAS over the last decade: Andrei Runov, Jonathan Eastwood, Arjun Raj, Nikolai Tsyganenko, Steven J. Schwartz, Hannes Leinweber, Aaron Flores, Kate Ramer, Brian Kerr, Michael Feuerstein, Lydia Philpott, Ben Sadeghi, Jianbao Tao, Chris Chaston, Xuzhi Zhou and Terry Zixu Liu, Karl Yando and Naritoshi Kitamura. Additional contributions to SPEDAS through the SPDF development team came from the following individuals: Reine Chimiak, Codie Gladney, Bernie Harris, Howard Leckner, Natalia Papitashvili and Ron Yurow. We also thank Ms. Judy Hohl and Mr. Emmanuel Masongsong for their editorial assistance. The core SPEDAS team acknowledges support from NASA contract NNG17PZ01C (for SPEDAS community support) to UCLA, contract NNG04EB99C (as subcontract from SwRI for MMS SPEDAS plug-in development) to UCLA, and contract NAS5-02099 (THEMIS support of TDAS maintenance and SPEDAS infrastructure) to UCB, UCLA and BU. UCB also acknowledges support from NASA grant NNX16AP95G (for WIND 3DP work), NASA contract NNN06AA01C (for PSP/FIELDS work). The THEMIS team also acknowledges contributions from F. S. Mozer for use of the EFI data; S. Mende for use of the ASI data, the Canadian Space Agency for logistical support in fielding and data retrieval from the GBO stations; K. H. Glassmeier and W. Baumjohann for the use of the FGM data provided under the lead of the Technical University of Braunschweig and with financial support through the German Ministry for Economy and Technology and the German Center for Aviation and Space (DLR) under contract 50 OC 0302. The IUGONET team acknowledges support from JSPS KAKENHI grant JP15H05816. ERG work was done by the ERG-Science Center operated by ISAS/JAXA and at ISEE/Nagoya University. ERG work was also partially supported by the GEMSIS project of ISEE (formerly STEL) at Nagoya University. Y. Miyoshi acknowledges support from Japan’s JSPS KAKENHI grants 15H05815, 15H05747, and 16H06286. Y. Kasahara acknowledges support from Japan’s JSPS KAKENHI grant 16H04056. S.-Y. Wang acknowledges support from Taiwan grants MOST 105-3111-Y-001-042, and MOST 106-2111-M-001-011, and C.-Y. Chiang and S.W.Y. Tam acknowledge support from Taiwan grant MOST 107-2111-M006-003. BARREL authors acknowledge NASA grant NNX08AM58G and the BARREL team for development of the BDAS software. BARREL data and software can be obtained through the SPEDAS software package distribution as well as from the CDAWeb website. GOES authors acknowledge contributions from Janet Green. Y. Nishimura acknowledges grants NASA NNX17AL22G and NSF AGS-1737823. GIMNAST work for SPEDAS was supported by NSF’s AGS-1004736 and AGS-1004814.

Funding Information:
The THEMIS team also acknowledges contributions from F. S. Mozer for use of the EFI data; S. Mende for use of the ASI data, the Canadian Space Agency for logistical support in fielding and data retrieval from the GBO stations; K. H. Glassmeier and W. Baumjohann for the use of the FGM data provided under the lead of the Technical University of Braunschweig and with financial support through the German Ministry for Economy and Technology and the German Center for Aviation and Space (DLR) under contract 50 OC 0302. The IUGONET team acknowledges support from JSPS KAKENHI grant JP15H05816.

Funding Information:
BARREL authors acknowledge NASA grant NNX08AM58G and the BARREL team for development of the BDAS software. BARREL data and software can be obtained through the SPEDAS software package distribution as well as from the CDAWeb website. GOES authors acknowledge contributions from Janet Green. Y. Nishimura acknowledges grants NASA NNX17AL22G and NSF AGS-1737823. GIMNAST work for SPEDAS was supported by NSF’s AGS-1004736 and AGS-1004814.

Keywords

  • Geospace science
  • Ionospheric physics
  • Magnetospheric physics
  • Planetary magnetospheres
  • Solar wind
  • Space plasmas

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The Space Physics Environment Data Analysis System (SPEDAS)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this