The (un)discovering of ecology by Alaska Native ecologists

Wendy F. Smythe, Sarah Peele

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

When do Native students discover ecology and what factors contribute to the low enrollment of diverse students? Addressing such questions is crucial for diversifying science disciplines and the workforce of ecology and geoscience disciplines. Field sciences such as ecology have notably low enrollment of students from underrepresented groups, such as Black/African American, Hispanic/Latinx, and Native American or Alaska Natives. Here we discuss the factors that affect Native students and provide strategies to improve recruitment and retention of Native students in the sciences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere02354
JournalEcological Applications
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported in part by National Science Foundation Grants DEB-1311616 and GEO-1034611. The authors would like to acknowledge and thank the Hydaburg Cooperative Association for their support. Special thanks to Doreen Witwer and Anthony Christianson for their support and guidance working with the Hydaburg community.

Funding Information:
This work was supported in part by National Science Foundation Grants DEB‐1311616 and GEO‐1034611. The authors would like to acknowledge and thank the Hydaburg Cooperative Association for their support. Special thanks to Doreen Witwer and Anthony Christianson for their support and guidance working with the Hydaburg community.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 by the Ecological Society of America

Keywords

  • Native ecology
  • diversity
  • ecological mentoring
  • historical knowledge
  • traditional ecological knowledge

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The (un)discovering of ecology by Alaska Native ecologists'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this