The use of Spanish language educational materials by American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial association teams

Paul D. Edwards, Zobeida E. Bonilla

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The goals of this study were to assess U.S.-based American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association (ACPA) teams' use and perceived need for Spanish-language educational materials and to evaluate trends in number of Spanish-speaking patients treated. Methods: A facsimile survey was sent to U.S.-based teams listed in the ACPA 1999 to 2000 and 2001 to 2002 Team Directories. Questions addressed demographics for Spanish-speaking patients/families and use of Spanish-language educational materials. Teams with a recent increase in Spanish speakers, 25% or more Spanish speakers, or both received a more in-depth follow-up survey. Results: Response rate to the initial survey was 71%. Almost 16% of teams reported having greater than 25% primarily Spanish speakers. Forty-four percent of responders saw an increase in Spanish speakers over the past 5 years, and 41% of responders used Spanish-language materials of some type. Fifty-seven teams were sent a follow-up survey and 29 (51%) teams responded. Teams reported a need for more Spanish-language educational materials on specific craniofacial conditions, and many expressed frustration in communication and interaction with Spanish speakers. Conclusions: Many U.S.-based ACPA teams reported an increase in primarily Spanish speakers and expressed a need for more Spanish-language educational materials in different formats. Consideration of the diverse dialectic, cultural, and literacy needs of U.S. Spanish speakers can contribute to more effective educational efforts and improved care of the increasing number of Latinos treated by ACPA teams.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)655-660
Number of pages6
JournalCleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2004

Keywords

  • Cleft lip/palate
  • Craniofacial
  • Culture
  • Educational materials
  • Hispanic
  • Latino
  • Spanish
  • Survey
  • Videos

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