Tic-related activity restriction as a predictor of emotional functioning and quality of life

Christine A. Conelea, Andrew M. Busch, Mark A. Catanzaro, Cathy L. Budman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a chronic neuropsychiatric condition that frequently persists into adulthood. Existing research has identified demographic and symptom-level variables associated with psychopathology and poor quality of life in TS. However, behavior patterns associated with enhanced or adaptive psychological and global functioning among adults with TS have yet to be empirically identified. The current study examined whether tic-specific activity restriction is related to emotional functioning and quality of life in adults with TS. Methods Participants were 509 adults from the Tourette Syndrome Impact Survey who completed self-report measures of demographics, tic severity, emotional functioning, quality of life, and tic-related general and social activity restriction. Results Partial correlations controlling for tic severity indicated that tic-related general and social activity restriction were significantly correlated with lower quality of life and poorer emotional functioning. Hierarchical linear regression models indicated that activity restriction significantly predicted lower quality of life and poorer emotional functioning when controlling for tic severity and demographic variables. Conclusions Adults who restrict fewer activities due to tics, regardless of tic severity, experience greater quality of life and better emotional functioning. Clinically, adults with chronic tics may benefit from interventions focused on enhancing engagement in valued life activities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-129
Number of pages7
JournalComprehensive Psychiatry
Volume55
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014
Externally publishedYes

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