Time-related, cross-sectional and prospective follow-up of pancreatic endocrine function after pancreas allograft transplantation in Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients

Paul Robertson, P. Diem, D. E.R. Sutherland

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26 Scopus citations

Abstract

It has been established that successful pancreas transplantation in Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients results in normal but exaggerated phasic glucose-induced insulin secretion, normal intravenous glucose disappearance rates, improved glucose recovery from insulin-induced hypoglycaemia, improved glucagon secretion during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia, but no alterations in pancreatic polypeptide responses to hypoglycaemia. However, previous reports have not segregated the data in terms of the length of time following successful transplantation and very little prospective data collected over time in individual patients has been published. This article reports that in general there are no significant differences in the level of improvement when comparing responses as early as three months post-operatively up to as long as two years post-operatively when examining the data cross-sectionally in patients who have successfully maintained their allografts. Moreover, this remarkable constancy in pancreatic islet function is also seen in a smaller group of patients who have been examined prospectively at various intervals post-operatively. It is concluded that successful pancreas transplantation results in remarkable improvements in Alpha and Beta cell but not PP cell function that are maintained for at least one to two years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S57-S60
JournalDiabetologia
Volume34
Issue number1 Supplement
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1991

Keywords

  • C-peptide
  • Glucagon
  • Insulin
  • Pancreas
  • Transplantation

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