Tissue burns due to contact between a skin surface and highly conducting metallic media in the presence of inter-tissue boiling

John P. Abraham, John Stark, John Gorman, Ephraim Sparrow, W. J. Minkowycz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

A numerical-based model was developed and implemented to determine the spatial and temporal temperature distributions within skin tissue resulting from thermal contact with a heated and high thermal conductivity metallic medium. In the presence of wet tissue, boiling is likely to occur, thereby affecting the probability of inducing burns. This investigation deals with how contact between a hot, highly conductive metallic material and skin gives rise to burns. In particular, the study focuses on the likelihood that metals typically used in cooking or industrial applications may cause burns. Insofar as the surfaces under consideration are above the boiling temperature of water, a mathematical model including phase change was developed. That model allowed different thermophysical properties to be respectively employed for dry and wet tissues. Multiple processes and their governing parameters were investigated to assess their impact on burn severity, including the temperature of the metal, the duration of contact, the contact resistance between the surface and the skin, the temperature range over which phase change occurred, and the cooling environment after the exposure. It was discovered that the most important parameters are the surface temperature and exposure duration. The other conditions/parameters had lesser impacts on the results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)369-378
Number of pages10
JournalBurns
Volume45
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2019

Keywords

  • Bioheat transfer
  • Burns
  • Contact burns
  • Hot surfaces
  • Thermal injury

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Tissue burns due to contact between a skin surface and highly conducting metallic media in the presence of inter-tissue boiling'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this