Tobacco smoke exposure in nonsmoking hospitality workers before and after a state smoking ban

Joni A. Jensen, Barbara A. Schillo, Molly M. Moilanen, Bruce R. Lindgren, Sharon Murphy, Steven Carmella, Stephen S. Hecht, Dorothy K. Hatsukami

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Secondhand smoke exposure is estimated to account for 3,000 cancer deaths per year. Although several countries and states in the United States have passed comprehensive smoke-free laws to protect all employees, a significant number of workers are still not protected. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of passing a comprehensive smoking ban that included bars and restaurants on biomarkers of nicotine and carcinogen exposure. The urines of nonsmoking employees (n = 24) of bars and restaurants that allowed smoking before the smoke-free law were analyzed before and after the law was passed in Minnesota. The results showed significant reductions in both total cotinine and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (free plus glucuronidated) after the ban was instituted. These results provide further support for the importance of protecting employees working in all venues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1016-1021
Number of pages6
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2010

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