Towards a U.S. national program for monitoring native bees

S. Hollis Woodard, Sarah Federman, Rosalind R. James, Bryan N. Danforth, Terry L. Griswold, David Inouye, Quinn S. McFrederick, Lora Morandin, Deborah L. Paul, Elizabeth Sellers, James P. Strange, Mace Vaughan, Neal M. Williams, Michael G. Branstetter, Casey T. Burns, James Cane, Alison B. Cariveau, Daniel P. Cariveau, Anna Childers, Christopher ChildersDiana L. Cox-Foster, Elaine C. Evans, Kelsey K. Graham, Kevin Hackett, Kimberly T. Huntzinger, Rebecca E. Irwin, Shalene Jha, Sarah Lawson, Christina Liang, Margarita M. López-Uribe, Andony Melathopoulos, Heather M.C. Moylett, Clint R.V. Otto, Lauren C. Ponisio, Leif L. Richardson, Robyn Rose, Rajwinder Singh, Wayne Wehling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

North America has more than 4000 bee species, yet we have little information on the health, distribution, and population trends of most of these species. In the United States, what information is available is distributed across multiple institutions, and efforts to track bee populations are largely uncoordinated on a national scale. An overarching framework for monitoring U.S. native bees could provide a system that is responsive to national needs, resources, and capacities. Five major action areas and priorities for structuring a coordinated effort include: (1) Defining the scope, aims, and cost of a national native bee monitoring program; (2) Improving the national capacity in bee taxonomy and systematics; (3) Gathering and cataloging data that are standardized, accessible, and sustainable; (4) Identifying survey methods and prioritizing taxa to monitor; and (5) Prioritizing geographic areas to be monitored. Here, we detail the needs, challenges, and opportunities associated with developing a multi-layered U.S. national plan for native bee monitoring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number108821
JournalBiological Conservation
Volume252
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The United States Department of Agriculture convened a workshop in Sheppardstown, WV in 2018 to outline the needs and challenges associated with establishing a U.S. national native bee monitoring network. This workshop included experts in bee biology and data management from across the U.S. and included representatives from industry, non-profit organizations, universities, and Federal, state, and local government. This work was supported by U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Agricultural Research Service and National Institute of Food and Agriculture (2018-38831-28147, 2018; 2020-67014-31865, 2020). Descriptions of a national native bee monitoring effort are theoretical in nature and are not a recommendation or endorsement by the USDA or the U.S. Government. Any use of trade, firm, or product names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the US Government. USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Funding Information:
The United States Department of Agriculture convened a workshop in Sheppardstown, WV in 2018 to outline the needs and challenges associated with establishing a U.S. national native bee monitoring network. This workshop included experts in bee biology and data management from across the U.S., and included representatives from industry, non-profit organizations, universities, and Federal, state, and local government. This work was supported by U.S. Department of Agriculture 's (USDA) Agricultural Research Service and National Institute of Food and Agriculture ( 2018-38831-28147 , 2018; 2020-67014-31865 , 2020). Descriptions of a national native bee monitoring effort are theoretical in nature and are not a recommendation or endorsement by the USDA or the U.S. Government. Any use of trade, firm, or product names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the US Government.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Elsevier Ltd

Keywords

  • Monitoring
  • Native bees
  • Pollinators

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