Transient state kinetic analysis of the ATP-induced dissociation of the dynein-microtubule complex.

M. E. Porter, K. A. Johnson

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Abstract

The kinetics of ATP-induced dissociation of dynein from the dynein-microtubule complex has been investigated by stopped flow light scattering methods. The addition of ATP to the dynein-microtubule complex induced a large, rapid decrease in light scattering followed by a smaller and much slower decrease. The fast light scattering change was shown to be a measure of the ATP-induced dissociation of dynein from the dynein-microtubule complex and was distinguished from microtubule disassembly by several criteria. (i) The fast reaction occurred over a period of milliseconds and the rate was a function of the ATP concentration, whereas, the slow reaction occurred over a period of several seconds and was independent of ATP concentration; (ii) the amplitude of the fast reaction was directly proportional to the amount of dynein bound to the microtubule lattice; and (iii) only the slow phase was inhibited by the addition of the microtubule-stabilizing drug, taxol. The rate of ATP-induced dissociation of dynein from the microtubule increased linearly with increasing ATP concentration to give an apparent second order rate constant for ATP binding equal to k1 = 4.7 X 10(6) M-1 s-1 according to the following pathway: (formula; see text) where M X D represents the dynein-microtubule complex and D represents dynein. The loss of signal amplitude at high ATP concentration provided a minimum estimate for the rate of dissociation of the ternary complex (M X D X ATP) equal to kd greater than 1000 s-1. Thus, the dynein-microtubule system is similar to actomyosin in that ATP induces an extremely rapid dissociation of dynein from the microtubule.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6582-6587
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume258
Issue number10
StatePublished - May 25 1983

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