Understanding optical turbulence using coordinated atmospheric measurements and large eddy simulation (LES) Modeling

Qing Wang, Benjamin J. Wauer, Ryan T. Yamaguchi, Oswaldo Alvarenga, Lian Shen, Robert Crabbs

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Extensive in situ measurements and modeling initiatives are planned to improve meteorological forecast in support of High Energy Laser (HEL) weapon operations. The key is to understand the atmospheric boundary layer processes affecting optical turbulence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPropagation Through and Characterization of Atmospheric and Oceanic Phenomena, pcAOP 2019
PublisherOSA - The Optical Society
ISBN (Print)9781943580637
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
EventPropagation Through and Characterization of Atmospheric and Oceanic Phenomena, pcAOP 2019 - Munich, Germany
Duration: Jun 24 2019Jun 27 2019

Publication series

NameOptics InfoBase Conference Papers
VolumePart F164-pcAOP 2019

Conference

ConferencePropagation Through and Characterization of Atmospheric and Oceanic Phenomena, pcAOP 2019
Country/TerritoryGermany
CityMunich
Period6/24/196/27/19

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Here, we provide an overview of a five-year multidisciplinary collaborative research project, Quantifying and Understanding Environmental Turbulence Affecting Lasers (QueTal), sponsored by the US Joint Directed Energy Transition Office (DE-JTO) under its Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MRI). The ultimate goal of QueTal is to improve the capability of mesoscale models in predicting the optical scintillation environment. To that end, QueTal intends to collect a large number of dataset in different atmospheric forcing conditions for testing and validating theories and empirical formulations relevant to optical turbulence and to understand the nature of atmospheric turbulence effect on optical propagation. Eventually, QueTal intends to form an optical turbulence parameterization relating the macroscopic atmospheric parameters, such as mean wind, temperature, humidity, and surface temperature, to optical turbulence. We achieve these objectives through several field campaigns over land and sea and by using state-of-the-art numerical simulations based on a large eddy simulation (LES) modeling approach. This summary intends to give an overview of the QueTal project.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 Optics InfoBase Conference Papers. All rights reserved.

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