Unsuspected infectious diseases and other medical diagnoses in the evaluation of internationally adopted children

M. K. Hostetter, S. Iverson, K. Dole, Dana E Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

64 Scopus citations

Abstract

Seven simple screening tests - hepatitis B profile, urine culture for cytomegalovirus, Mantoux test for tuberculosis, stool examination for ova and parasites, VDRL, complete blood cell count, and vision and hearing screening - were used to evaluate 52 consecutive children at a pediatric clinic for international adoptees. In 63% of these children, unsuspected medical diagnoses were made by a combintion of history, physical examination, and appropriate screening tests. When only those children previously examined by a physician in the United States were included in our analysis, the rate of unsuspected diagnosis remained high (67%). Omission of screening tests was the single most frequent cause of missed diagnoses, of which the majority were infectious diseases. More than 50% of our newly established diagnoses carried the potential for long-term sequelae without proper treatment. These data emphasize that internationally adopted children should receive a thorough screening evaluation for medical problems that may adversely affect their growth and development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)559-564
Number of pages6
JournalPediatrics
Volume83
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989

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